2017

David Perry Photographer

The Smartphone Storyteller

October 27 | 8:30 | 90 Minutes | Oxford Hotel, Lava Room

In The Smartphone Storyteller, David will explore the idea that most people take pictures of ‘nouns’, when they could be making far more emotive and fascinating pictures if they were shooting everything that describes those nouns, the adjectives, adverbs and the prepositions. The differences are as profound as the differences between a first grade reader, and an excerpt from some wondrous work of literature. Making more literate pictures means showing us the nuances that make viewers privy to the time of day, the season, the color, size, feel, texture (smooth, rough, shiney, dull), where a thing is relative to other things (prepositions), and the effects it has on the spaces it occupies. And then, we move on from there to discuss the idea of making pictures that support and inform one another, as a set of images that can tell a larger and more nuanced story, rather than simply thinking about making that one, stand alone picture.

Where I'll Be

October 27 | 8:30 The Smartphone Storyteller

David is a photographer, teacher and storyteller. His work has been featured in Fine Gardening many times, including six cover features in the past few years. He is also a frequent contributor to Sunset magazine and has had his work featured in This Old House, American Rose, Better Homes & Gardens, Flower, Leaf, Garden Design, Pacific Horticulture and Cut Flower Quarterly.

David has recently completed a book project that’s been he’s been working on for the past three years,The Northwest Garden Manifesto: Create, Restore, and Maintain a Sustainable Yard, written by John Albers and published by Skipstone Press, and was co-creator of The 50 Mile Bouquet (St. Lynn’s Press, 2012), with author, Debra Prinzing. David also lectures and teaches photography workshops around the country and in his West Seattle garden, and offers classes in photography and storytelling currently through The Center for Urban Horticulture at University of Washington Botanic Gardens.